Similes

Similes

Similes

Similes

As you learned in the previous chapter that we could compare two things of the same proportion using As-As structure. Similes are something like As-As structures, but in similes, we compare two different things. We compare the attributes of one to another. In this lesson, we will learn about similes.

A formal definition of similes:

A simile is a speech figure that compares two different things or shows similarities between two different things using ‘as’ or ‘like.’

Metaphor v/s simile: 

Most of the time, people think similes and metaphors are interchangeable. But that’s not correct. Unlike similes, metaphors draw a comparison between two things directly without using ‘as’ or ‘like.’ Whereas similes use ‘as’ or ‘like’ to draw a resemblance between two different things.

Example:  she is as innocent as an angel.

Here we are using ‘as’ to compare the innocence of a girl with an angle. So because of the usage of ‘as,’ it is a smile. 

Metaphor: she is an angel.

Similes usage:

The purpose of using a simile is to project an interesting connection in a reader’s mind. Similes are used in our everyday life, from poems to songs or in conversations. We often use similes in our everyday speech. 

Poets and singers use similes to convey their sentiments. Similes make our statements more powerful and vivid. The most commonly used idioms or expressions are similes.

For example: he is as brave as a lion.

Here we are comparing the attribute of a lion with a human. A human’s bravery is compared with the lion, or we are saying that the boy is brave like a lion. We are not interchanging a lion and human, but instead, we compare the similarities between two different things. Where in the case of As-As structures, we compare two things that belong to the same category.

Examples of some common similes using ‘AS’:

 

As brave as a lion.

As cunning as a fox.

As innocent as an angel.

As light as a feather

As slow as a turtle.

As dark as night.

As shiny as a star.

As slow as a snail.

As cold as ice.

As red as a rose.

As cheap as dirt.

As proud as a peacock

As easy as pie.

As clever as a fox.

As tough as nails.

As happy as Larry.

As red as a beetroot.

As heavy as a brick.

As happy as a dog.

As soft as wool.

As sharp as a knife.

As white as a swan.

As shiny as a diamond.

As different as night and day.

 

Examples of some common similes using ‘LIKE’:

 

Cuts like butter.

White like milk.

Old like ice.

Slept like a baby

Moves like a snail.

Clever like a fox.

Soft like velvet.

Sharp like a knife.

Ran like lightning.

Have eyes like a hawk.

Sweet like sugar.

Brave like a lion.

Slept like a baby

Shiny like a diamond.

Clever like a fox.

Free like a bird.

Like blots against the sky

Cunning like a fox.

Busy like a bee.

Proud like a peacock.

Like a warm laundry

Clever like a fox.

Swim like a fish.

Happy like a Larry.

Smell like a rose.

Red like a beetroot.

Exploded like a volcano

Happy like a dog.

Fast like a horse.

Heavy like a brick.

Racing like a scared bunny.

Soft like wool.

 

Simile used in sentences

  • He is as brave as a lion.
  • That girl is as innocent as an angel.
  • That car is as slow as a turtle.
  • My earrings are as shiny as a star.
  • Our room is as cold as ice.
  • Her cheeks are red as a beetroot.
  • Her nails are as sharp as a knife.
  • His ring is as shiny as a diamond.
  • His room is as dark as night.
  • He walks as slow as a snail.
  • Your bag is as heavy as a brick.
  • My blanket is as soft as wool.
  • Your answer is as different as night and day than my answers.
  • He is busy like a bee at the moment.
  • She smells like a rose.
  • Aleena swims like a fish.
  • The cake is sweet, like sugar.
  • Harry is funny as a monkey.
  • This cake is so soft because it cuts like butter.

Similes in Classic Literature

Similes can be used in literature too. Similes haven been used my some famous poets of English. 

Examples of similes in literature can be seen in the poem “A Red, Red Rose” by Robert Burns.

“O my Love is like a red, red rose. That’s newly sprung in June; O my Love is like the melody That’s sweetly played in tune.”

 

Another example of a simile can be found in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. :

“Is love a tender thing? It is too rough, too rude, too boisterous, and it pricks like thorn.”

 

Similes in Song Lyrics

Some similes can be found in songs too because similes convey a deeper meaning in few words.

  • It’s been a hard day’s night, and I’ve been working like a dog. - “A Hard Day’s Night,” The Beatles
  • You’re as cold as ice. - “Cold As Ice,” Foreigner
  • Steady as a preacher, Free as a weed - “American Honey,” Lady Antebellum
  • My heart is like an open highway. - “It’s My Life,” Bon Jovi
  • I will always remember the day you kissed my lips, light as a feather-“2002”, Annie Marie.
  • Satellite in my eyes, Like a diamond in the sky, How I wonder, Satellite strung from the moon, “Satellite”- Dave Matthews Band.
  • .If all it’s gonna cause is pain, Truth and my lies right now are falling like the rain. So let the river run. “River”- Eminem – (ft. Ed Sheeran)
  • And it seems to me you lived your life, Like a candle in the wind. - “Candle in the Wind,” Elton John

Conclusion:

In this lesson, we learned that similes are almost the same like as-as structures. But the only difference is that in similes we compare the attributes of things. And we compare things of different proportions. 

Jul 19,2020 | By Javaid Ahmed Solangi | Inenglish-language-teaching