There is, and There are

There is, and There are

There is, and There are

There is, and There are

These expressions have completed power over someone, and have a specific position, location in a sentence.

  • There is a bed in a room.
  • There is a picture on the wall.
  • There are two dictionaries in a bag.
  • There are fresh flowers in the garden.

At the same time, these expressions use countable singular and countable plural.

Singular forms

  • There is a large door in the Bangalow.
  • There is a clock on the wall.
  • There is a lamp on the table.

Plural forms

  • There are his shoes.
  • There are my family photos.
  • There are two matches on Sunday.

There are two parts of this, one is long-form, and the other is the short form long form describe the all the words with details, but the short form doesn’t explain the details to all the words, these are;

Long forms of there are.

Here, they can not be contracted.

Contraction forms of “there is”:

  • There is a mobile.
  • There’s a mobile.
  • There is a calculator.
  • There’s a calculator.
  • There is a coin.
  • There’s a coin.

Negative use

It means there isn’t; there isn’t anything that has custody over someone.

  • There is not Charles bag.
  • There is not a company.
  • There is not a complete meal
  • There are not a few pages remaining.
  • There are no oranges in the basket.
  • There are not many students.

Interrogative use

These expressions use for asking something to someone.

  • Is there a tree.
  • Is there a diamond ring in your finger.
  • Is there a black dress in the wardrobe.
  • Are there pink lipsticks in the box.
  • Are there several boys.
  • There are five hospitals in the city.

Use “Any” with uncountable nouns in question.

Any- we can use any in a positive sentence, but any is more common here use as question forms.

  • Is there any chance of getting it?
  • Is there any petrol in the vehicle?
  • Is there any milk in the fridge?
  • Is there any gas in Selander?

Use “Any” with plural nouns in interrogative form.

Sometimes, any use with plural nouns that is more common in sentences.

  • Are there any documents in the office.
  • Are there any doctors in the hospital.
  • Are there any boats in the river.
  • Are there any toys in the shop.

Use “Any” in negative with uncountable nouns.

Often any can be used as uncountable nouns.

  • There is not any steel in the earrings.
  • There is not any tea in a kettle.
  • There is not any petrol station here.

 

Use “Any” in negative with plural nouns.

Often any can be used as plural nouns.

  • There are not any stamps in the office.

Use “How many “in question with plural nouns.

How many references to numbers which tell us the quantity of a thing.

  • How many papers are there?
  • How many trees are there?
  • How many balloons are there?

Some/Any

These are quantifiers unit, which indicates not the exact amount or a precise number of something.

Thus, we use positive sentences.

  • I have some water.
  • You have some energy.
  • They have some strong feelings.

Some/Any use for countable and uncountable nouns.

  • Hina sends some pictures to me.
  • I sold some vegetables.
  • The children have eaten some sandwiches.
  • You have made some soup.
  • We enjoyed some juice yesterday.
  • I don’t have any water, I jug.
  • She doesn’t have any brothers.
  • There is no flour in the bag.

Use “Any” interrogative

Do I have any fuel?

Does he have any sisters?

Little/Few

These quantitative express small units refer mostly negative amounts of the quantity called the quantitative adjectives, which tell the quality of nouns.

Few

Use in positive ways,

  • He is coming in a few minutes.
  • Do you have a few secrets?
  • I need a few books.

Use for plural countable nouns.

Those things which count easily use Few in a specific way.

  • I have a few photos on the mobile.
  • Anna made a few paintings for the seminar.
  • Ali took a few pills after the morning meal.

Little

Little is a  small special quantitative adjective that expresses the units as kg, milligrams, etc.

It is used for uncountable nouns.

  • I have little money in my purse.
  • She has made little progress.
  • Sara has little hope.

Few and little can be used in an informal way,

  • Rubab has only a little power.
Jul 02,2020 | By Javaid Ahmed Solangi | Inenglish-language-teaching